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New Yorkers love scooters

New Yorkers love scooters

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New Yorkers love scooters celebrities no clothes
Image by Ed Yourdon This was taken at the northwest corner of Broadway and 87th Street. I'm well acquainted with this area, because I lived directly across the street for about 8 years. Note that the woman is zooming past a Brooks Brothers outlet. When I first came to New York City, back in the Dark Ages, there was only one Brooks Brothers store, and it was located at Madison and 44th Street. You'll be delighted to know that that store was opened in 1818 (on the corner of Catharine and Cherry Street in lower Manhattan), and that Brooks Brothers outfitted Abraham Lincoln, and 39 of the 44 American Presidents (including John Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama). Ralph Lauren started off as a salesman at Brooks Brothers, former French President Jacques Chirac still buys his shirts there, and Andy Warhol bought all of this clothes at Brooks Brothers. When I first got married in 1968, I even got my wedding suit here; little did I know I was in the company of Presidents and famous celebrities… But now the stores are all over the damn place. As of 2012, there were 210 Brooks Brothers outlets in the U.S. and 70 other countries … including this location on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Interestingly, the space now occupied by the men's clothing store had been vacvvant for several years; and back when I lived across the street, it was a Southeast Asian restaurant where I had lunch almost every day. But none of this is likely to be of any interest to the young woman seen here, zooming past the store on her Razor Scooter. Some people just have no appreciation for history... *************** This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street. That's all there is to it … Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that's more than I'm willing to commit to at this point, and I'll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers. Oh, actually, there's one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month -- unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side -- plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don't expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I'll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at. As for the criteria that I've used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I'll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it's really a terrific picture!" A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I'm hoping that I'll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I'm hoping that I'll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I'll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that's not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that's New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular." As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments -- and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you've been around as long as I have, it's even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?" So, with the expectation that I'll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I'm going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010's (I have no idea what we're calling this decade yet). Or maybe they'll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11". Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I've already taken a bunch, and I don't know if I'll ultimately decide that they're worth uploading. Women's fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I'm definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I'll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?" Another example: I'm fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn't true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they've also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can't help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they're incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs. Oh, one last thing: I've created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day's photo-walk. I'll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I've been, by clicking on this link URL link to Ed's every-block progress through Manhattan If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you'd like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block ...

Avril Lavigne The Black Star Tour Malaysia 2012 celebrities no clothes
Image by aSMawi Avril Ramona Lavigne (pronunciation: /ˈævrɨl ləˈviːn/; av-ril lə-veen; born 27 September 1984) is a Canadian singer-songwriter. She was born in Belleville, Ontario, but spent most of her youth in the small town of Napanee. By the age of 15, she had appeared on stage with Shania Twain; by 16, she had signed a two-album recording contract with Arista Records worth more than million. In 2002, when she was 17 years old, Lavigne broke onto the music scene with her debut album Let Go. Let Go made Lavigne the youngest female soloist to reach No. 1 in the UK, and the album was certified four-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. By 2009, over 18 million copies had been sold worldwide. Her breakthrough single, "Complicated", peaked at No. 1 in many countries around the world, as did the album Let Go. Her second album, Under My Skin, was released in 2004 and was her first album to peak at No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard 200, eventually selling more than 10 million copies worldwide. The Best Damn Thing, Lavigne’s third album, was released in 2007, becoming her third No. 1 album in the UK Albums Chart and featuring her first U.S. Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 single, "Girlfriend". Lavigne has scored five number-one singles worldwide, including "Complicated", "Sk8er Boi", "I'm with You", "My Happy Ending" and "Girlfriend". With more than 30 million copies of her albums sold worldwide, Lavigne is one of the top-selling artists releasing albums in the U.S., with over 10.25 million copies certified by the RIAA. Her fourth studio album, Goodbye Lullaby, was released in March 2011. Goodbye Lullaby gave Lavigne her fourth top 10 album on the U.S. Billboard 200 and the UK Albums Chart and her third No. 1 album in both Japan and Australia. Three months after the release of Goodbye Lullaby, Lavigne began work on her fifth album which will be released on Epic Records following her departure from RCA Records. Lavigne branched out from recording music, pursuing careers in feature film acting and designing clothes and perfumes. She voiced a character in the animated film, Over the Hedge, in 2006. That same year, she made her on-screen feature film debut in Fast Food Nation. In 2008, Lavigne introduced her clothing line, Abbey Dawn, and in 2009, she released her first perfume, Black Star, which was followed by her second perfume, Forbidden Rose, in 2010 and her third perfume, Wild Rose, in 2011. In July 2006, Lavigne married her boyfriend of two years, Deryck Whibley, lead singer and guitarist for Sum 41. The marriage lasted a little over three years, and in October 2009, Lavigne filed for divorce. Whibley and Lavigne continued to work together, with Whibley producing her fourth album, as well as Lavigne's single, "Alice", written for Tim Burton's film Alice in Wonderland.

1947 Musical Movie Ad, "Song of Scheherazade," Starring Yvonne De Carlo, Brian Donlevy, Jean-Pierre Aumont, & Eve Arden celebrities no clothes
Image by classic_film Post-WWII period film musical/drama, magazine advertisement for "Song of Scheherazade," starring Yvonne De Carlo (September 1, 1922 - January 8, 2007), Brian Donlevy (February 9, 1901 - April 5, 1972), Jean-Pierre Aumont (January 5, 1911 - January 30, 2001), and Eve Arden (April 30, 1908 - November 12, 1990). Produced by Universal International Pictures, the film's working title was "Fandango." Plot summary, via IMDb: In 1865, the cadets of a Russian Naval Academy ship have shore leave in Morocco; among them is (fictionalized) future composer 'Nicky' Rimsky-Korsakov. In search of a piano, Nicky and singing ship's doctor Klin meet a family of once-wealthy Spanish colonists...and their daughter Cara who secretly dances in a cabaret. Romantic complications ensue, but Nicky seems less interested in Cara's favors than in inspirations for his future masterpieces. ************ Published in The Family Circle magazine, January 1947, Vol. 30 No. 1 Fair use/no known copyright. If you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license)

 
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